Michael Gaigg: Über UI/UX Design

5Mar0

Benefits & Principles of User-Centered Design

Posted by Michael Gaigg

We, the people, have been around for quite some years now. Computers, software, applications and the web not so much. Therefore it is clear that applications have to adjust to the people and not the other way round.

Many design principles have developed throughout the decades, but the main difference of user-centered design to others is that

UCD tries to optimize the user interface around how people can, want, or need to work, rather than forcing the users to change how they work to accommodate the system or function.

Purpose of UCD

UCD answers questions about users and their tasks and goals, then use the findings to make decisions about development and design.

UCD seeks to answer the following questions:

  • Who are the users of the application?
  • What are the users’ main tasks and goals?
  • What are the users’ experience levels with the application?
  • What functions do the users need from the application?
  • What information might the users need, and in what form do they need it?
  • How do users think the application should work?

Benefits & Return of Investment

  • Increased usability
    • Higher degree of customer satisfaction
    • Continued business
    • Higher revenues
  • Project management optimization
    • Focus on important functionality early
    • Unforeseen user requirements
  • Reduced costs
    • Training costs
    • Help-Desk calls and service costs

UCD Principles

  • Focus on users’ needs, tasks and goals
  • Spend time on initial research and requirements
    • Identify your target audience and observe them (accomplishing their tasks)
    • Let users define product requirements
  • Emphasis on iterative design process
  • Evaluate system on real target users

Summary

Nobody could state it simpler than Susan Dray: "If the user can’t use it, it doesn’t work".

17Dec0

UCD Method: Focus Groups

Posted by Michael Gaigg

What it is

A focus group is a moderated discussion that lasts about two hours and covers a range of pre-selected topics.

In traditional focus groups, a screened (qualified target audience) group of respondents gathers in the same room. A moderator guides the group through a loosely structured discussion that probes attitudes about a client's proposed products or services. The moderator is typically given a list of objectives or an anticipated outline. Additional questions might serve to initiate open-ended discussions.

When to use

Requirements phase

Cost

High

Output

Non-Statistical

Sample Size

6-9 users

Pro's / Gains

  • Discover what users want/desire/belief
  • Observe group dynamics and organizational issues
  • Show users spontaneous reactions and ideas

Con's / Disadvantages

  • Don’t trust what people say or pretend to do
  • Possible bias through specialized groups

How to perform

  • Select representative participants.
  • Identify problem area (what you want to learn).
  • Prepare a script for the moderator to follow.
  • Hire a skilled moderator (facilitator).
  • Allow flexibility during the test to keep the discussion flowing.
  • Tape and/or observe the test.
  • Create good notes of the test.

References

9Nov0

User-Centered Design (UCD) Methods: Comparison and Overview

Posted by Michael Gaigg

This is the first in a series of blogs describing User-centered Design Methods. My goal is to summarize my experience, insights and findings across multiple literature and compile them into easy and quick to digest pieces for you to consume. I want to encourage you to comment your own experiences and give me feedback on why your company applies certain methods differently or not at all or something else altogether.

I personally don't like the term Usability too much, it's an empty buzz word. It means SOMETHING to everybody but isn't scientific enough to be taken serious. It's often interpreted wrongly and purely misunderstood by most. It's kinda like Psychology, we know it is important to understand fundamental human behavior, their problems and remedies, but I wouldn't pay a dime to go to a Psychologist. But who knows, just as Psychology got its scientific relevance and acknowledgment - partly maybe through the 'invention' of the IQ - hopefully Usability rises up to similar levels (Jeff Sauro offers interesting metrics via SUM (Single Usability Metric).

That's why I like the term User-centered Design. It works wonders with Project Managers and the-like, probably because Design is such an important term in their daily work. And when asked about Usability testing I can conveniently point out that this is only one tool of many in my UCD toolbox. But the really important sales trick is to know which UCD method is best used at what time in the project management cycle.

The following chart compares the most common user-centered design methods, outlines their cost and shows when to use them:

Overview of user-centered design methods

Comparison of User-centerd Design (UCD) Methods
Method Cost Output Sample Size When to Use
Competitive Studies Medium Stat. & Non-Stat. 5 Requirements
Focus Groups High Non-Statistical 6-9 Requirements
Field Studies High Non-Statistical 2-3 Requirements
Heuristic Evaluation Low Statistical 2-3 Design
Paper Prototyping Medium Stat. & Non-Stat. 5 Design
Card Sorting High Statistical 15-20 Design
Participatory Design Low Non-Statistical n/a Design
User Testing Medium Stat. & Non-Stat. 5 Design & Evaluation
Surveys Low Statistical 20+ Requirements & Evaluation
Interviews High Non-Statistical 3-5 Requirements & Evaluation
Server Traffic Log Analysis Low Statistical n/a Evaluation
Search Log Analysis Low Statistical n/a Evaluation

Not long ago, after having completed a full project management cycle (requirements, design, implementation and evaluation) the PM proudly announced to perform a Focus Group with his stakeholders. Showing the ready application, he thought, would surely impress them and lead to valuable feedback for the next milestone. This impulse isn't uncommon but has to be fought before it becomes reality. Does he really want to produce MORE and EXPENSIVE requirements? Because that's the output of Focus Groups. Wouldn't he be better off running 2 iterations of User Testing to reveal usability issues or a Survey to receive input from outside the development environment?

Recommendations

  • Requirements:
    • Competitive Studies
    • Interviews
    • Field Studies
  • Design:
    • Heuristic Evaluation
    • Paper Prototyping
    • User Testing
  • Evaluation:
    • Surveys
    • Server Traffic Log Analysis
    • Search Log Analysis
    • User Testing
  • The Usability effort is NOT proportional to the size of the project. Bigger projects spend less percentage on UCD with same effort. Regardless, as a rule of thumb assign 10% of the projects budget for UCD.
  • Faster iterations of prototype design require less testers

References