Michael Gaigg: Über UI/UX Design

15Jun0

ColoRotate – 3D color scheme generator with social component

Posted by Michael Gaigg

Following up my blog entry on How to Create a Color Palette for your Website I stumbled over a fascinating color scheme generator: ColoRotate.

Screenshot of ColoRotate

Screenshot of ColoRotate

What is ColoRotate

Set into motion by Michael Douma, the executive director of the Institute for Dynamic Educational Advancement, ColoRotate is a Flash-based application with a custom 3D display engine for visualization. When other palette generators are primarily focusing on the 2D color wheel, ColoRotate uses a prism to display color, luminescence, saturation, and brightness all in once. I found it very easy and intuitive to use and was able to produce a harmonious color palette within seconds (well, not that it was for any special purpose) and export the colors as CSS to my clipboard.

Community

Lazy registration

Lazy registration


Lazy registration with filled out information

Lazy registration with filled out information


Here comes the part that I love: Sign in using your google account to save and share schemes. Yes, that means one can in reverse search, get inspired and re-use existing user-generated schemes.

Loving it.

Note on the side: Loving even more the lazy registration process 🙂

Facit

Go, check it out. It's not just another tool in your design toolbox. Look out for the Creative Suite 4 (CS4) plugin to come and start showcasing your palettes and discuss them with the community.

1May0

Best Practices for Accessible Stylesheets

Posted by Michael Gaigg

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), or short Stylesheets, is a language used to describe the presentation (that is, the look and formatting) of a document written in a markup language like HTML.

The stylesheet language as described in CSS level 2 revision 1 helps to separate presentation from structure and thus adds flexibility to the look and feel of a web page. Stylesheets are useful for the following reasons:

  • Can be re-used for many documents
  • Saves download times by caching by the browser
  • Presentational changes are fast and easy and only in one document
  • Development can be done independently from content and logic
  • Increases ability to program for device independence
  • Application of different styles for different output formats (e.g. print)

Basic Rules

  • Add Stylesheets whenever possible (minimize number of stylesheets)
  • Use them consistently across all pages
  • Use linked stylesheets rather than embedded styles; avoid inline stylesheets
  • Stylesheets do not substitute correct and meaningful structure

Best Practices

Level 1

Level 1 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Description W3C 508 Example
Organize documents so they may be read without style sheets 6.1 d Ensure that important content appears in the document object and is not generated by style sheets (i.e. through :before and :after pseudo-elements).

Level 2


Level 2 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Description W3C 508 Example
Use style sheets to control layout and presentation 3.3 n/a
<HEAD>
<TITLE>Drop caps</TITLE>
<EM class="highlight" title="provide STYLE element">STYLE</EM> type="text/css">
.dropcap { font-size : 120%; font-family : Helvetica }
</EM class="highlight" title="provide STYLE element">STYLE</EM>>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<P><SPAN class="dropcap">O</SPAN>nce upon a time...
</BODY>

Level 3

Level 3 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Description W3C 508 Example
Create a style of presentation that is consistent across pages 14.3 n/a A consistent style of presentation on each page allows users to locate navigation mechanisms more easily but also to skip navigation mechanisms more easily to find important content.

Template

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html lang="en">
<head>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="BaseStyleSheet.css" />
</head>
<body>
Hello World
</body>
</html>


/* Base CSS Document */
/**
Elements
*/
html, body, div, span, applet, object, iframe,
h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6, p, blockquote, pre,
a, abbr, acronym, address, big, cite, code,
del, dfn, em, font, img, ins, kbd, q, s, samp,
small, strike, strong, sub, sup, tt, var,
dl, dt, dd, ol, ul, li,
fieldset, form, label, legend,
table, caption, tbody, tfoot, thead, tr, th, td {
margin: 0;
padding: 0;
border: 0;
outline: 0;
font-weight: inherit;
font-style: inherit;
font-size: 100%;
font-family: inherit;
vertical-align: baseline;
}
/* remember to define focus styles! */
:focus {
outline: 0;
}
body {
line-height: 1;
color: black;
background: white;
font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
}
ol, ul {
list-style: none;
}
/* tables still need 'cellspacing="0"' in the markup */
table {
border-collapse: separate;
border-spacing: 0;
}
caption, th, td {
text-align: left;
font-weight: normal;
}
blockquote:before, blockquote:after,
q:before, q:after {
content: "";
}
blockquote, q {
quotes: "" "";
}
/**
Classes
*/
/**
IDs
*/

References

6Nov0

Design Guidelines: Pagination

Posted by Michael Gaigg

One thing I hear from visual designers over and over again: 'Those Usability guys destroy our creative possibilities'. While I understand the desire to live in complete design heaven I want to strongly emphasize the need for a usable design heaven. Every thing in this world has a certain affordance, i.e. it affords to do something which we need to design for. A chair for example affords to be seated on, designers are therefore constrained to design chairs in a way that supports the human body while sitting. Now, does that restrict creativity in chair design? Without doubt NO, numerous examples show that thousands of different chairs exist but all have one common goal: to support the task on hand - which is seating a person!

Chair Design

Variety of chairs showing the existence of a usable design heaven

Designing page elements like pagination is not different. Navigation options must be visible and the pagination must be intuitive. Creative solutions can still be user-friendly as shown in smashingmagazine's Pagination Gallery.

But now, here are the

Design Guidelines for Pagination

  1. Provide large clickable areas
  2. Don’t use underlines
  3. Identify the current page and don't hyperlink it
  4. Space out page links
  5. Provide Previous and Next links
  6. Use First and Last links (where applicable)
  7. Only use Last links when they make sense
  8. Put First and Last links on the outside
  9. Provide a reasonable number of pagination links
  10. Eclipse missing or endless pages

Code Sample / Template

End results (from http://digg.com/):
Example Pagination

<div class="pagination">
<span class="nextprev">&laquo; Previous</span>
<span class="current">1</span>
<a title="Go to page 2" href="/page2" mce_href="/page2">2</a>
<a title="Go to page 3" href="/page3" mce_href="/page3">3</a>
<a title="Go to page 4" href="/page4" mce_href="/page4">4</a>
<a title="Go to page 5" href="/page5" mce_href="/page5">5</a>
<a title="Go to page 6" href="/page6" mce_href="/page6">6</a>
<a title="Go to page 7" href="/page7" mce_href="/page7">7</a>
<a title="Go to page 8" href="/page8" mce_href="/page8">8</a>
<a title="Go to page 9" href="/page9" mce_href="/page9">9</a>
<a title="Go to page 10" href="/page10" mce_href="/page10">10</a>
<span>…</span>
<a title="Go to page 252" href="/page252" mce_href="/page252">252</a>
<a title="Go to page 253" href="/page253" mce_href="/page253">253</a>
<a title="Go to Next Page" class="nextprev" href="/page2" mce_href="/page2">Next &raquo;</a>
</div> 


.pagination {
margin: 5px 0;
line-height: 2em;
}
.pagination span {
}
.pagination a:hover {
background-color: #7F7FB2;
color: #FFF;
}
.pagination a, .pagination a:visited, .pagination a:active {
border: 1px solid #CCC;
background-color: #F2F2F7;
font-weight: normal;
padding: 2px 5px;
text-align: center;
color: #000;
text-decoration: none;
}
.pagination .selected {
background-color: #7F7FB2;
color: #FFF;
font-weight: bold;
}

References

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