Michael Gaigg: Über UI/UX Design

5Dec0

Highlights for Week 48/2011

Posted by Michael Gaigg

7Jun0

Highlights of Week 22/2011

Posted by Michael Gaigg

21Sep4

16 Color Schemes for Your Website

Posted by Michael Gaigg

16 Color Schemes

16 Color Schemes

I love colors! I can't get enough of them actually. They inspire me, they give me good mood, they make me smile. So I started collecting them, first in real life - more about that later - and then online.

Now I want to share 16 color combination that are harmonic and that you can use for your next web project:

F78D13
73C8FE
FEA5F4
DF43A4
B9B9B9
CC2201
0C34BB
747474
5E82EE
FDE05E
DD4D28
D5DCE4
225577
EE7722
22AAAA
667711
1B325F
EEF8FE
F26C24
3C89C8
B49A73
587A27
2A7FD6
FFFFFF
FDBE21
FFFFFF
5E722E
3399FF
79AEC0
C84630
DFB34B
8B7956
8E7CBF
EACD89
C6C1C1
E2DFF8
C12D1E
6F9EC7
9E6744
F8DFA7
21708F
BD1700
0B394E
E19314
2299CC
888888
885599
FF9900
F2DFBE
A27F57
B6A666
9C5B47
185A00
FFCC00
E70808
08398C
E62D17
E8AC3C
B12211
DD8E00
A62B1B
7E8AAE
381211
425F9A
20Apr0

Excellent read: Quality in Web Design

Posted by Michael Gaigg

Stumbled upon this blog entry by liam, loved it, shared it: How to Spot Quality within Web Design: Examples & Tips.

One can truly see the effort that went into all the visual examples (thanks, love that most) and compilation of useful tips!

Here the outline:

  1. Spacing
  2. Pixel Perfect Detail
  3. Well thought out Typography
  4. Organization of Elements
  5. Restraint & Subtlety
  6. Using Colour to it’s Full Potential
  7. Doing something Nobody else has done

Got an interesting article or blog entry?

I'd love to read and eventually share your content. Please feel free to add your links to the comments section so I can 'stumble upon' them too :)

25Feb11

Go figure: Are You Colorblind? Take a quick Color Vision Test

Posted by Michael Gaigg

8% of the male population has a red/green color weakness. Take a quick color vision test to see where you stand ;) The following 8 images were taken from PseudoIsochromatic Plate Ishihara Compatible (PIP) Color Vision Test 24 Plate Edition by Dr. Terrace L. Waggoner.

Can you identify the numbers?

Leave a comment with your answers (or guesses hahahaha).

Demonstration Plate 1

Demonstration Plate 1

Demonstration Plate 2

Demonstration Plate 2

Demonstration Plate 3

Demonstration Plate 3

Demonstration Plate 4

Demonstration Plate 4

Demonstration Plate 5

Demonstration Plate 5

Demonstration Plate 6

Demonstration Plate 6

Demonstration Plate 7

Demonstration Plate 7

Demonstration Plate 8

Demonstration Plate 8

Suggested reading:
7Jan0

Best Practices for accessible Images

Posted by Michael Gaigg

Graphics can be of great benefit to the accessibility of a Web page by providing

  • Illustrations
  • Icons
  • Animations
  • other visual cues that aid comprehension for sighted individuals

When designing for people with disabilities too often we forget that we are not designing only for the blind. We must consider disabilities of all types. Graphics can be useful especially to individuals with certain reading disabilities, learning disabilities, attention deficit disorders, or cognitive disabilities.

Basic Rules

  • Do not use color alone to convey meaning
  • Choose contrast so that text is easily distinguishable from the background
  • Communicate the purpose of the graphic (not its appearance) through meaningful alternative text
  • When graphics require complex descriptions use the longdesc attribute, a link to an alternative page, a description in the context itself, or a “D” link
  • Use empty alt text for decorative, transparent, spacer, and redundant images
  • Try to limit the amount of text in graphics
  • Do not use effects that flicker or produce a strobe-like effect
  • Use images as backgrounds only if they do not convey important content (since it is impossible to add alt text to background images)

Best Practices

Level 1

Level 1 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Description W3C 508 Example
Ensure that all information conveyed with color is also available without color 2.1 c Ensure that information is available through other style effects (e.g., a font effect), through context (e.g,. comprehensive text links) or through mark-up (e.g., the title attribute).
Until user agents allow users to control flickering, avoid causing the screen to flicker 7.1 j n/a
Provide text equivalent for Images, graphical or animated buttons, spacers, bullets 1.1 a <FORM action="..." method="post">

  <INPUT type="button" alt="Click this button to verify form" value="Verify" onclick="verify()">

  <INPUT type="image" name="submit" src="button.gif" alt="Submit form">

</FORM>

Level 2

Level 2 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Description W3C 508 Example
Ensure that foreground and background color combinations provide sufficient contrast when viewed by someone having color deficits or when viewed on a black and white screen 2.2 c For more information check the online paper about Effective Color Contrast.
When an appropriate markup language exists, use markup rather than images to convey information 3.1 n/a Mark up complex equations with e.g. MathML.
Avoid causing content to blink 7.2 n/a n/a
Avoid movement in pages 7.3 n/a i.e., hide/show content or change presentation (movement and colors).

Level 3

Level 3 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Description W3C 508 Example
Supplement text with graphic or auditory presentations where they will facilitate comprehension of the page 14.2 n/a n/a

References

28Oct0

Best Practices for accessible Links

Posted by Michael Gaigg

It is essential that users can find, identify, and comprehend hypertext links quickly. Even though there are no Level 1 (A) checkpoints associated with links it is pretty easy to fulfill Level 2 and even Level 3. It's definitely worthwhile the little effort with the added benefit that e.g. most browsers render the title attribute as a tooltip.

Basic Rules

See also my Design Guidelines for Links.

  • Contrast link text color and regular text color
  • Underline link text
  • Ensure link text is descriptive of its destination
  • Make visited links change color
  • Limit link text to a maximum of four words
  • Place important words at the front of link text
  • Minimize amount of links to seven (excluding the menu) unless they are presented in a clear structure
  • Use meaningful pathnames when creating directory structure

Best Practices

Level 1

No Level 1 requirements.

Level 2

Level 2 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Checkpoint Description W3C 508 Example
Links Clearly identify the target of each link 13.1 n/a <A href="my-doc.html">My document is available in HTML</A>,<A href="my-doc.pdf" title="My document in PDF">PDF</A>,

<A href="my-doc.txt" title="My document in text">plain text</A>

Level 3

Level 3 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Checkpoint Description W3C 508 Example
Links Create a logical tab order 9.4 n/a <A tabindex="2" href="link2.txt"">Link 2</A><A tabindex="1" href="link1.txt">Link 1</A>

<A tabindex="3" href="link3.txt">Link 3</A>

Links Provide keyboard shortcuts to important links 9.5 n/a <A accesskey="2" href="link2.txt"">Link 2</A><A accesskey="1" href="link1.txt">Link 1</A>

<A accesskey="3" href="link3.txt">Link 3</A>

Links Include non-link, printable characters (surrounded by spaces) between adjacent links 10.5 n/a [<A href="a.htm">Link A</A>] [<A href="b.html">Link B</A>] or<A href="a.htm">Link A</A> | <A href="b.html">Link B</A>

Templates

Find out more about <a title="Michael Gaigg IT Solutions Webpage" href="http://www.michaelgaigg.com/">IT Solutions</a>

References

21Oct0

Best Practices for accessible Content

Posted by Michael Gaigg

People rarely read Web pages, they scan the page! As a result, Web pages have to follow Design Guidelines for Content that enable them to quickly identify headings, titles, links and other important elements to orient themselves. What else has to be done to be Section 508 compliant?

Basic Rules

  • Don’t rely on color alone
  • Identify the language used throughout the document and identify changes
  • Use correct markup to emphasize important content
  • Be clear and precise in the choice of wording and language

Best Practices

Level 1

Level 1 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Checkpoint Description W3C 508 Example
Color Ensure that all information conveyed with color is also available without color 2.1 (c) Ensure that information is available through other style effects (e.g., a font effect), through context (e.g,. comprehensive text links) or through mark-up (e.g., the title attribute).
Language Clearly identify changes in the natural language of a document's text and any text equivalents 4.1 n/a And with a certain <SPAN lang="fr">je ne sais quoi</SPAN>,
she entered both the room, and his life, forever. <Q>My name
is Natasha,</Q> she said. <Q lang="it">Piacere,</Q>
he replied in impeccable Italian, locking the door.
Language Use the clearest and simplest language appropriate for a site's content 14.1 n/a n/a

Level 2

Level 2 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Checkpoint Description W3C 508 Example
Blinking Avoid causing content to blink 7.2 n/a n/a
Movement Avoid movement in pages 7.3 n/a i.e., hide/show content or change presentation (movement and colors).

Level 3

Level 3 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Checkpoint Description W3C 508 Example
Text Ensure that foreground and background color combinations provide sufficient contrast when viewed by someone having color deficits or when viewed on a black and white screen 2.2 (c) For more information check the online paper about "Effective Color Contrast" at lighthouse.org (http://www.lighthouse.org/accessibility/effective-color-contrast/).
Abbreviations Specify the expansion of each abbreviation in a document where it first occurs 4.2 n/a <ABBR title="social security number">SS#</ABBR>

or ASCII art:<ABBR title="smiley in ASCII art">:-)</ABBR>
Acronyms Specify the expansion of each acronym in a document where it first occurs 4.2 n/a Welcome to the <ACRONYM title="World Wide Web">WWW</ACRONYM>
Language Identify the primary natural language of a document 4.3 n/a <HTML lang="en">

Templates

<HTML xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">

<ABBR title="social security number">SS#</ABBR>

<ACRONYM title="Geographical Information System">GIS</ACRONYM>

References

15Oct0

Design Guidelines: Links

Posted by Michael Gaigg

"If links were married they'd get divorced all the time! That's because they can't keep their promise." (Gerry McGovern)

What Gerry means is that what links say they will do and what they actually do are total opposites. How many times have I believed, clicked and followed a link that promised me to 'Download this or that' just to find another page describing this piece of software. There I had to muddle through even more links just to find another 'Download version' link that yet again takes me to another page acknowledging the terms and conditions. The story could go on and on.

Remember: Good links are like magnets - they drive users to them.

With that in mind, here are the

Design Guidelines for Links

  1. Color and underline link text (exceptions include lists of links like a navigation menu)
  2. Reserve underlining for links (do not underline text that is not a link)
  3. Use different colors for visited and unvisited links (e.g. shades of blue)
  4. Avoid using color for text unless it is a link and never use blue for non-text links (even if your links are not blue)
  5. Avoid changing the font style on mouse over
  6. Avoid tiny text for links
  7. Use appropriate spacing between links or use a clear separator
  8. Use links primarily for navigation between pages
  9. Link text must be describe the target as short and precise (clear call to action) as possible AND hold this promise!

Best Practices

See my blog entry for Best Practices for accessible Content

References:

 

Suggested reading:
13Oct13

How to Create a Color Palette for your Website

Posted by Michael Gaigg

A palette is a complete set of colors one should adhere to when designing a website. This includes a color scheme (typically 2, 3 or 4 colors) plus some additional colors to work with. The goal along the design process is to stick to these colors without the need of inventing and introducing new ones.

Here are some tools and knowledge on how to design and create an effective and appealing color palette for you website in just minutes:

Know your primary color

Many times you will be constraint by your clients' need for a primary color, be it because of the logo, corporate identity (CI) or corporate design (CD) guidelines. Consider yourself lucky!
For the other times when you have to come up with a color for yourself, think of what best represents the company's target audience - young, fashion, pop, serious, technocratic, playful. All that will determine your ultimate choice. The best description I've found so far of what different colors actually stand for is in Jason Beaird's book 'The Principles of Beautiful Web Design'. Even though I'm sure you find tons of other sources on the web be aware of easy color-meaning mappings like black=death - in web design black is also a color that conveys power, think of tuxedos, limosines, Batman etc.

Create a Color Scheme

I've found the Red-Yellow-Blue color wheel the closest to traditional color theory and that's what I am using and writing about now. I acknowledge the CMYK (Cyan-Magenta-Yellow-Black) color wheel but found it less useful for my purposes (feel free to convince me otherwise ;) )

Color Wheel

I highly recommend the WellStyled Color Scheme Generator 2 (http://www.wellstyled.com/tools/colorscheme2/index-en.html). It allows you to use your primary color and your knowledge about your target audience to play around and find the most suitable of the five classic color schemes:

  • monochromatic (your primary color in different tints or shades)
  • analogous (your primary color plus two colors next to it on the wheel)
  • complementary (=contrast; your primary color plus the opposite color on the wheel)
  • triadic (three colors equally separated on the wheel)
  • tetradic (basically two complementary schemes combined)

The Color Scheme Generator will calculate the correct RGB values in hexadecimal notation for you and even offer variations (pastel, contrast, pale) to further experiment. Once done, simply print or note the colors and values computed and you are ready to roll.

Ensure good Contrast

Contrast is not only a good design principle but also an Accessibility requirement for many websites (W3C, Section 508 in the US). So before you make your final choice on the color scheme ensure that your main color provides sufficient contrast to background/foreground colors.
Test your colors using Colour Contrast Check (http://www.snook.ca/technical/colour_contrast/colour.html) making sure the brightness difference is greater 124 and the color difference is not less than 500!

Finalize your Color Palette

To finalize your color palette all you need to determine is which other tints and shades of the existing (as determined above) color scheme you want to use - black and white included.
As a basic rule try not to 'overload' your page with the amount of colors used, but certainly a number of 5 or 6 seems to be about right (remember to count black and white).

Done, wasn't that easy?

Here are some interesting links I recommend together with an excellent book:

Suggested reading: