Michael Gaigg: Über UI/UX Design

28Aug3

Presentation: Wiki – the right tool for my organization?

Posted by Michael Gaigg

Finally I got my head around posting a presentation I gave last March. The title is "Wiki - the right tool for my organization?" and had the purpose of introducing the concept of a wiki to a group that was about to install a wiki within their department.

Background: About three years ago I went through the effort of evaluating existing wiki platforms, installing/hosting it for our department and keeping it alive for the next two years before it got sacked. I'm here to tell you why it didn't work out in the end.

Characteristics

I jump right into the characteristics (the slide "Characteristics" is duplicated in the presentation on purpose) because I found understanding them key to a successful implementation. That's why once more I want to emphasize on the issues that need to be met in order to successfully implement a wiki, for example if your company has no culture of sharing content or employees are reluctant to give up ownership of their code, a wiki is most likely not the ideal collaboration tool.

These are the characteristics of a wiki:

  • Perpetual work in progress
  • No one owns the content
  • No specific organization (hyperlinks)
  • Anyone can edit other people’s work
  • Discussion area for each page
  • Version control: list of all changes made to a page

Critical Success Factors (aka truth about a wiki)

Only implement a wiki if you feel comfortable you can meet the following critical success factors:

  • Only 10% contribute; only 1% on a regular basis.
  • Obey the characteristics of a wiki
  • Power to the people
    • Trust the user
    • Authority to change something
    • Refuse defined structures

My previous experience taught me that implementing a wiki into your organization is doomed to fail if one is not aware of their importance and therefore

  • overestimates the reach and participation,
  • neglects the characteristics of a wiki,
  • or doesn't want or cannot give power to the people.

The truth is, only 10% of users contribute to a wiki and only 1% on a regular basis. If you have 100 employees you can expect between 1 to 10 of them to contribute and the rest to consume - which in turn will lead to lesser contribution and lesser consumption over time. Wikipedia works well because there are millions of users where 1% is still significant number to keep up quality content.
The argument of mandatory (or even monitored) participation runs directly against the characteristics of a wiki, is counter-productive and will result in your wiki failing.

Choosing a wiki: What to consider

Obviously there are many criteria and features that will directly affect your choice. I recommend Comparison of wiki software as a starting point for finding the right software but I wouldn't be surprised if you ended up with MediaWiki which is the used by wikipedia for one simple reason (besides its free usage under the GPL license and its huge community): the MediaWiki syntax is widely used and makes actually sense to learn - because it is wikipedia ;)

Criteria

  • Cost (open source license)
  • Programming language (PHP, C#, Java)
  • Data backend (File system or DB)
  • Extensibility & user community

Features

  • WYSIWYG editing & Syntax
  • Version control & Discussions
  • Permissions & Security

Keys to get a wiki going

Once you've decided to go ahead and install a wiki, what can be done to make it successful?

  • Find dedicated helpers
  • Partner with groups/people related to your mission
  • Offer structural templates for new pages
  • Add some content to major categories
  • Do lots of marketing
  • If possible, offer training

Do you work with wikis?

What are your experiences? Do you use a wiki in your company? How do you use it?

3Aug7

Website Analytics I: Browser Support

Posted by Michael Gaigg

Which browser platform should we design for? To most web developers this question is a nightmare and dilemma at the same time, but yet again we face it almost on a daily basis. Just to show you how difficult an answer might be is the disparity between two projects I'm involved in, one for a federal government body that by definition only supports IE6 and another that is expected to be finished in 6 months and therefore was hoping to target IE8. Are these expectations realistic?

Analytics

Let's have a look at some website analytics that were collected over the past year (July 2008 - July 2009), taken from Fanposter.org, a social media website with over 5000 registered users from almost 100 countries and collected through Google Analytics.
Note: While I'm aware that the audience of this website might not be representative for all age groups or countries/regions, it still provides valuable hints about browser usage and trends.

Lesson 1: Internet Explorer on the fall

Internet Explorer is historically bundled with Microsoft Windows Operating Systems. IE6 was released August 27, 2001 just months before WinXP; IE7 was released October 18, 2006 and included with Windows Vista and Win Server 2008; IE8 final was released March 19, 2009 and will be included with Windows 7.

Figure 1: Website Analytics, Browsers Comparison

Figure 1: Website Analytics, Browsers Comparison

The combined total market share for Internet Explorer over the past year was 76.5% but the trend shows a clear decline over the past months from 74.0% in May to 68.8% in June and 53.9% in July.

Will this trend continue to hold true?

A lot will depend on the upcoming release of Windows 7 in October 2009 with Microsoft's power in reaching the people to upgrade their browsers. But almost certainly Microsoft will loose its dominant position of 95% in 2002 and 2003 (IE5 & IE6) or over 75% in the past year to its numerous very capable competitors.

Lesson 2: IE8 on the rise

Figure 2: Website Analytics, Browsers Comparison, Internet Explorer

Figure 2: Website Analytics, Browsers Comparison, Internet Explorer


When comparing the 3 current versions of Internet Explorer out there (IE6, IE7 and IE8 with IE5 and lesser not appearing in the analytics anymore and therefore being disregarded) it seems to be evident that IE8 is on the rise. Though the really surprising observation is that this increase cannot be accounted to users abandoning IE6 but rather to users upgrading their version of IE7. How come? The answer seems to lie in fact that many companies and their IT departments as well as governmental bodies still continue to hold on to and enforce the use of IE6. Can Microsoft overcome these - mostly security-related - concerns through IE8?

Lesson 3: IE6 might not die as soon as we all may wish

Figure 3: Google Trends

Figure 3: Google Trends; The spikes D, E & F indicate the introductions of Beta 1 (March 5, 2008), Beta 2 (August 27, 2008) and Final respectively.


As discussed above IE6 is still a requirement for many users. A quick look at Google Trends reveals that searches for IE6 (Figure 3: blue line) have been pretty stable over the past 4-5 years while searches for IE7 (Figure 3: red line) are declining and searches for IE8 (Figure 3: yellow line) are in the lead. This goes hand in hand with the observations in Lesson 2 above.

In the meantime let's join the numerous battles to kill IE6 like Norwegian Websites Declare War on IE 6 and IE Death March or more seriously at Bring down IE6. Joke or not, IE6 will be around for some more time and therefore needs to be considered if we want it or not.
It won't even help that Digg is discussing to drop support for IE6 or YouTube Will Be Next To Kiss IE6 Support Goodbye. Both sites don't need users that cannot upgrade IE6 e.g. due to limitations at work because exactly these users have limited access restricted by their companies anyway.

Lesson 4: Firefox stays on top

A very interesting observation is the fact that Firefox does a really great job in staying on top of things and keeping their user base up to date. In the last month of the observation period less than 5% of all Firefox users had a version lesser than 3, or in other words, the great majority of Firefox users was using version 3 and higher. And with versions 3.7 and Firefox 4 in the making, a huge base of motivated developers and fascinating plug-ins the future looks bright. Firefox's marketshare seems to climb steadily also, as of July 2009 it showed 32.1% (20.5% average over the past year) with the majority Windows versions and only 0.6% on Mac and 0.2% on Linux. Obviously we all love the high commitment to standards compliancy that makes developing web apps a blast, right?

Firefox 4 Mockup (Win Vista)

Firefox 4 Mockup (Win Vista)

Lesson 5: Chrome & Safari

Google Chrome was released December 11, 2008 and first received as Google's never-ending battle against Microsoft (see graphic by Federico Fieni) but more likely just another smart move to keep users on the web - the faster, the better - or like Ben Parr explains "Revenue = Amount of Time on the Web".

Google vs Microsoft: Chrome

Google vs Microsoft: Chrome

As far as marketshare is concerned, Chrome rose to 2.3% in July according to my analytics. This is still fairly small but not to be underestimated. In terms of testing Google's developer page for Chrome suggests that "if you’ve tested your website with Safari 3.1 then your site should already work well on Google Chrome". But what about Safari?

Safari accounts for 1.3% in the yearly average (with 1.2% on Mac and the rest on Windows). Should we test Safari with a marginal share like this? It really depends on your budget and company structure which might require unjustified additional resources for your QA team. Do the math for yourself: 1% of 10k visitors are 100 potential customers - is it worth the effort?

Lesson 6: Opera is the misunderstood genius

Opera shows an average of 1.1% with an unexpected peak in July 2009 - I need to continue observing where and why that came from. Needless to say, Opera is strong in European countries like Russia and on mobile devices such as mobile phones, smartphones and PDA's (personal digital assistants). It's a shame that Opera is not further ahead, it has been and still is innovator and spearhead in terms of new useful features as well as standards compliancy and implementation.

What are your experiences?

Without giving any decisive conclusions I'd like to hear your experiences or analytics to this subject. For which browser platform do you design for? What do you tell your clients when they ask you this question?

2Jul4

Free book online: Search User Interfaces

Posted by Michael Gaigg

Marti Hearst generously made her upcoming book "Search User Interfaces" available for reading online. She is definitely not a newcomer to the scene and the book for sure not a Best-Of compilation, moreover the book is written in an academic fashion that backs up its theses usability studies, log studies, or some other form of proof (like it!) - like Harry Brignull states: "Caution: actual thought may be required when reading this book."

Contents: Search User Interfaces

The book has two main parts: search fundamentals (Chapters 1-7) and advanced topics (Chapters 8-12).

0: Preface
1: Design of Search User Interfaces
2: Evaluation of Search User Interfaces
3: Models of the Information Seeking Process
4: Query Specification
5: Presentation of Search Results
6: Query Reformulation
7: Supporting the Search Process
8: Integrating Navigation with Search
9: Personalization in Search
10: Information Visualization for Search Interfaces
11: Information Visualization for Text Analysis
12: Emerging Trends in Search Interfaces
References
Index

Suggested reading:
16Jun1

The Three-?-stick

Posted by Michael Gaigg

The Three-?-stick is going around ... and and so it came around. Björn from the Webzeugkoffer (excellent webdesign blog in German) picked up the stick by answering 3 questions that I will answer now too:

The three questions

Which Editor do you use for (X)HTML and CSS?

I'm using Macromedia Dreamweaver. I'm still stuck at MX 2004, but I really got used to the color coding and other superficial things - it's like toothpaste, once you are hooked you'll never change again (don't ask for the trade pls).

...and notepad ;)

Which little tool became a true time saver for you?

Can't live without Firebug - seriously, can't live without it. That's not a little tool? Ok, what about ColorSet, love that also.

Flash - what do you think of that technology?

Call me a purist, but I'm really into DHTML. Unless somebody convinces me otherwise I can do what I need to do with HTML a JavaScript library like jQuery, Dojo, YUI or even the Facebook JavaScript Library.
I disliked flash when it got into 'mode' a century ago and still think that flash intros should die. Accessibility is still an issue also.

On the flipside our company created a really powerful ArcGIS API for Flex for building Rich Internet applications on top of ArcGIS Server, our internet mapping server. I might need to reconsider some of my previous believes.

I forward the three-?-stick to

15Jun16

ColoRotate – 3D color scheme generator with social component

Posted by Michael Gaigg

Following up my blog entry on How to Create a Color Palette for your Website I stumbled over a fascinating color scheme generator: ColoRotate.

Screenshot of ColoRotate

Screenshot of ColoRotate

What is ColoRotate

Set into motion by Michael Douma, the executive director of the Institute for Dynamic Educational Advancement, ColoRotate is a Flash-based application with a custom 3D display engine for visualization. When other palette generators are primarily focusing on the 2D color wheel, ColoRotate uses a prism to display color, luminescence, saturation, and brightness all in once. I found it very easy and intuitive to use and was able to produce a harmonious color palette within seconds (well, not that it was for any special purpose) and export the colors as CSS to my clipboard.

Community

Lazy registration

Lazy registration


Lazy registration with filled out information

Lazy registration with filled out information


Here comes the part that I love: Sign in using your google account to save and share schemes. Yes, that means one can in reverse search, get inspired and re-use existing user-generated schemes.

Loving it.

Note on the side: Loving even more the lazy registration process :)

Facit

Go, check it out. It's not just another tool in your design toolbox. Look out for the Creative Suite 4 (CS4) plugin to come and start showcasing your palettes and discuss them with the community.

22May3

Beware of the Frankenstein Design

Posted by Michael Gaigg

Frankenstein Design

Frankenstein Design

"It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly burnt out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open..." (Chapter 5). Sounds familiar to us geeky programmers out there? Yes, and the root of all evil are clients that design their webpage from a sushi menu, picking whatever they like.

Usually I encourage my clients to look around, get inspired and show me what they like. It gives me a sense of how they think and into which directions they want us to go. But never forget: Clients identify problems, designers provide solutions! Understand why the client shows you a specific page or design element and what exactly they like in it. Don't feel pressured to include every detail in your final design otherwise you wake up at 1am facing a yellow-eyed creature and you'll end up with a Frankenstein Design.

Warning Signals

What are warning signals that your project might face a Frankenstein Design?

  • Client mentions Stakeholders too often. Money makes the world go round, but will eventually ruin the user experience.
  • Client fell in love with a bad design. Try to build solid knowledge about good and bad design principles so you can explain the pro's and con's of a particular design.
  • Client needs to please too many interests. It's understandable that every party involved wants to see their logo on the page, but honestly, one is enough ;)
  • Client decides on a color scheme. Besides corporate colors clients feel strongly about certain colors that either clash with your design, psychological theory or existing color schemes or are simply bad taste altogether.
  • Client has no idea at all. That means trouble! Not now, but once you are done. Guaranteed.
  • Got more?

What you can do

  • Listen. Hear what the client tells you and try to understand why they say it.
  • Feel. Sense what the underlying need is and translate it into design elements.
  • Talk. Speak up, don't shut up, don't wait until it's too late.
  • Fight. Pick your battles, don't let rules overrule what you think is right, at least voice it.
  • Reconsider. Don't get hooked to an idea too strongly, be open to erase your white-board drawings and start over.
  • Document. Make notes, sketch ideas, capture screens, summarize. Send these notes out.
  • CYA. Cover your ass, seek consensus and approval, set it in stone through written acknowledgments (mockups help).

Send me your experiences? What is missing on this list?

1May4

Best Practices for Accessible Stylesheets

Posted by Michael Gaigg

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), or short Stylesheets, is a language used to describe the presentation (that is, the look and formatting) of a document written in a markup language like HTML.

The stylesheet language as described in CSS level 2 revision 1 helps to separate presentation from structure and thus adds flexibility to the look and feel of a web page. Stylesheets are useful for the following reasons:

  • Can be re-used for many documents
  • Saves download times by caching by the browser
  • Presentational changes are fast and easy and only in one document
  • Development can be done independently from content and logic
  • Increases ability to program for device independence
  • Application of different styles for different output formats (e.g. print)

Basic Rules

  • Add Stylesheets whenever possible (minimize number of stylesheets)
  • Use them consistently across all pages
  • Use linked stylesheets rather than embedded styles; avoid inline stylesheets
  • Stylesheets do not substitute correct and meaningful structure

Best Practices

Level 1

Level 1 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Description W3C 508 Example
Organize documents so they may be read without style sheets 6.1 d Ensure that important content appears in the document object and is not generated by style sheets (i.e. through :before and :after pseudo-elements).

Level 2


Level 2 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Description W3C 508 Example
Use style sheets to control layout and presentation 3.3 n/a
<HEAD>
<TITLE>Drop caps</TITLE>
<EM class="highlight" title="provide STYLE element">STYLE</EM> type="text/css">
.dropcap { font-size : 120%; font-family : Helvetica }
</EM class="highlight" title="provide STYLE element">STYLE</EM>>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<P><SPAN class="dropcap">O</SPAN>nce upon a time...
</BODY>

Level 3

Level 3 Checkpoints - Section 508 Compliancy Standards
Description W3C 508 Example
Create a style of presentation that is consistent across pages 14.3 n/a A consistent style of presentation on each page allows users to locate navigation mechanisms more easily but also to skip navigation mechanisms more easily to find important content.

Template

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html lang="en">
<head>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="BaseStyleSheet.css" />
</head>
<body>
Hello World
</body>
</html>


/* Base CSS Document */
/**
Elements
*/
html, body, div, span, applet, object, iframe,
h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6, p, blockquote, pre,
a, abbr, acronym, address, big, cite, code,
del, dfn, em, font, img, ins, kbd, q, s, samp,
small, strike, strong, sub, sup, tt, var,
dl, dt, dd, ol, ul, li,
fieldset, form, label, legend,
table, caption, tbody, tfoot, thead, tr, th, td {
margin: 0;
padding: 0;
border: 0;
outline: 0;
font-weight: inherit;
font-style: inherit;
font-size: 100%;
font-family: inherit;
vertical-align: baseline;
}
/* remember to define focus styles! */
:focus {
outline: 0;
}
body {
line-height: 1;
color: black;
background: white;
font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
}
ol, ul {
list-style: none;
}
/* tables still need 'cellspacing="0"' in the markup */
table {
border-collapse: separate;
border-spacing: 0;
}
caption, th, td {
text-align: left;
font-weight: normal;
}
blockquote:before, blockquote:after,
q:before, q:after {
content: "";
}
blockquote, q {
quotes: "" "";
}
/**
Classes
*/
/**
IDs
*/

References

20Apr0

Excellent read: Quality in Web Design

Posted by Michael Gaigg

Stumbled upon this blog entry by liam, loved it, shared it: How to Spot Quality within Web Design: Examples & Tips.

One can truly see the effort that went into all the visual examples (thanks, love that most) and compilation of useful tips!

Here the outline:

  1. Spacing
  2. Pixel Perfect Detail
  3. Well thought out Typography
  4. Organization of Elements
  5. Restraint & Subtlety
  6. Using Colour to it’s Full Potential
  7. Doing something Nobody else has done

Got an interesting article or blog entry?

I'd love to read and eventually share your content. Please feel free to add your links to the comments section so I can 'stumble upon' them too :)

10Apr7

Design Guidelines: Error Messages

Posted by Michael Gaigg

Just some weeks ago I wrote about Design Guidelines for 404 Pages. Closely related are Error Messages in general, and believe me, they will save your life. That's why you need to get them right!

Why bad error message can hurt your company

Error messages are like saying "You are stupid", or "Come on old fart, you still don't get it?" - and that's bad, it's almost like constantly telling your kid "No, no, no". Be preventive, defensive and avoid Design Bloopers like the the one at Cingular: Having tried to log into my account the following error message appears "My Account is Currently Closed". Can you imagine the horror that bubbles up and the thoughts of who to call (but how?)? As it turns out Cingular was just maintaining their server and the only flawed thing was the error message. Is it possible to measure how much this little flaw will hurt the company?

Misleading and almost terrifying error message at Cingular

Misleading and almost terrifying error message at Cingular

Defensive Web Design

Prevent error messages whenever possible; e.g. "did you mean" at google.com

The beauty of usability design is to think of ways to prevent showing error messages at the first place. The most prominent example is probably Google. Have you ever seen an error message on Google? How great is the "Did you mean:" function... I even use it day by day as a spell checker, like I use google images to visualize words I didn't know (do you know what a vicuna is?).

Design Guidelines: Error Messages

  1. Avoid error messages if possible.
  2. Explicit indication that something has gone wrong
  3. Human-readable language
  4. Polite phrasing without blaming the user or imply that user is stupid or is doing something wrong
  5. Precise descriptions of exact problems
  6. Constructive advice on how to fix the problem
  7. Visible and highly noticeable, both in terms of message itself and how it indicates which dialogue element users must repair
  8. Preserve as much of the user’s work as possible
  9. Reduce the work of correcting the error (e.g. list of possibilities)
  10. Hypertext links may be used to connect a concise error message to a page with additional background information or explanation of the problem.

Did you ever encounter a 'special' error message?

Send me a screenshot and/or tell me the story behind it.

Suggested reading:
Page 19 of 23« First...10...1718192021...Last »